Focus on the Smallest Viable Market: This Is Marketing by Seth Godin

Marketing has come a long way from the days of targeting as many people as possible and hope that some might fit the perfect customer or client demographic. In fact, Seth Godin’s latest book, This Is Marketing clearly speaks to focusing on the smallest viable market. It opens the reader up to a world of possibilities.

This Is Marketing - a book by Seth Godin
This Is Marketing – a book by Seth Godin

If you have followed Seth Godin’s thinking over the years, you realise that This Is Marketing derives a lot of its inspiration from some of his other books. He takes it leaps ahead this time. From the idea of Tribes to Unleashing the Ideavirus, Seth Godin demonstrates how marketing has evolved and continues to be about the community you seek to serve. In this book, marketers are persuaded to listen more, to create meaningful connections between their brands and the people they have identified as their customers.


Listen and see

All marketers purport to understand their customer, to have a handle on who their potential clients are and to have messaging that reaches the right people. Some brands get it wrong about their customers, about people in general and this is because most companies don’t invest enough on learning about who they are targeting.


“Marketing isn’t a race to add more features for less money. Marketing is our quest to make change on behalf of those we serve”, says Seth Godin.

He goes on to share how companies that are devoted to understanding the culture of their audiences are more likely to win than those that focus largely – and mostly – on product improvements.

The more we listen and truly see our customers, the more likely we are to communicate authentically and create a marketing message that resonates.

The Smallest Viable Market

We have long been segmenting our customers, analysing demographics and communicating with people based on these. Or least who we believe are the most relevant people. The market we choose needs to be smaller, more specific and clearly defined.

Your work is not for everyone, it shouldn’t be and the more clearly defined your audience the smaller that community is. Part of the challenge Seth talks to is the fact that marketers dilute their messaging by trying to be more inclusive, while missing out on the opportunity to connect better with the right people.


“It’s impossible to create work that both matters and pleases everyone.” – Seth Godin (This Is Marketing)

From: This Is Marketing

Invest in trust and earn enrollment

Many brands invest getting their message out there, in making promises that they fail to keep which causes damage and destroys the affinity that people had. The opposite is to build trust, to encourage connection and to create unmatched customer experience through positive action. Especially when the worst happens. 


 “The goal isn’t to maximize social media numbers. The goal is to be known to the smallest viable audience.” – Seth Godin (This Is Marketing)

Trust, Seth Godin suggests, leads to enrollment. In this case the idea of enrollment is when people lean in, when they effortlessly connect and become part of the change you are working towards.

This book signifies a shift in marketing, in how we interact and connect with people for change to happen. Whether that change is to make a sale or to increase newsletter signups, this book has a compelling message about why you should focus on a small audience and grow that community. It also comes with a unique code to join a community of peers from across the globe who are changing the status quo in marketing.

Asics and Tekkie Town – A world of pain and no response

Leading up to a 21km run in – April 2016, after much procrastination, I bought my umpteenth pair of Asics running shoes from Tekkie Town in Boksburg. It was the first time that I bought from Tekkie Town and they turned out to be reasonable in comparison to other Asics stockists. The next day, I took this shiny new fiery orange pair of Asics Gel Nimbus 16 for a half marathon and sustained injuries that took to me days to recover from.

Tekkie Town complaint

Asics complaint at Tekkie Town

Some runners would say brand new running shoes aren’t great for races, as though they should be broken in and taken for some runs first, which I attributed the nearly broken legs to. Truth be told, I never had that problem in a pair of Asics. Five runs later, the problem persisted and I phoned Asics to find out what the issue could have been. This was not getting any better, I would suffer for a day or two before getting back on the road because of injuries.

On 4 May 2016 – a lady by the name of Kiera Powell took my call at Asics and she assured me that she would take care of the issue and that the call would help to speed up the process. She further advised that I return the shoes to Tekkie Town because they needed to assess the quality of this new pair of Gel Nimbus 16. According to her, the quality of the cushioning can sometimes deteriorate if the shoes are stored for too long. She also advised that I send an email with my details and a picture of the shoes which will form part of their assessment, which I very quickly did.

Emails to Asics South Africa

Emails to Asics South Africa

Part of the assessment includes images that the store sends to the manufacturer where they ascertain whether there is damage or not. That said though, the stockist – Tekkie Town in this case – knew exactly how to take the images. I’m no expert at photography or running shoes and I trust their just judgement.
Running shoes
The next step was to take the shoes to Tekkie Town in Boksburg – limps and all – and these were received by a friendly store manager who advised that the Asics consultant would assess the shoes and make recommendations. Anton said he would call me in a week and that went the same way as the emails from Asics, but when I eventually got a hold of him about two weeks later – he was just about to dial my number. Just about. Had I just waited another five minutes, he would have called with feedback to say the Asics consultant saw the shoes and they would revert with feedback.

Asics running shoes

Kiera Powell, had still not received my email or the report from Tekkie Town – she probably still hadn’t until I sent a tweet to their account finding out if she works there. These things get stuck in the mail, calls aren’t answered at Asics and well……the internet loses stuff and all.

By now, the old pair I was replacing began causing more injuries with every run that was meant to help mitigate the situation and it was better to buy another pair than to wait for Asics and send them more emails. Instead of not training, I got a new pair about a month later because there other one is still held captive. The assumption is that they completely taken the shoes apart and they are giving it thorough inspection. In fact, Anton left Tekkie Town and the new manager took on the case, also promised to return my call and she hasn’t.

Part of the theory is that it may be the wrong type of pair that the Asics Nimbus model was not right, but in fact I used a similar model for over a year. The one that this pair was meant to replace was also a Nimbus and it was as dream to run in.

Asics and Tekkie Town, when you read this – if you ever get to – please ask your labs and scientists how close they to concluding this case, it has now been four months. You have already phased out some designs and brought new ones in.

At the time of writing this, now in August 2016, I sent to tweet to Asics South Africa whom I think alerted Kiera Powell of the problem and she called but the issue still

Turn Critics Into Brand Evangelists

In recent news, a certain deep-fried chicken franchise went viral for the wrong reasons and if you followed the story, as I did for a while, you would have realised that the brand tried to engage. The unfortunate part was that as viral news stories go, the brand that’s a villain gets it the hardest.

I’m not saying I didn’t go to KFC a few times after the stories spread. You know. . . . . just to test at a few branches whether it was all true. How could I write about it if I didn’t test the chicken myself?

Meanwhile, there are brands whose communities grow, who are committed to adding one memorable customer story at a time. Brands like Rocomamas that I wrote about on Marklives. And yes, once again, I had to see whether any of what Brian Altriche, founder and chief operating officer of RocoMamas, told me was true. The hardest part was taking the stairs instead of elevators

The hardest part was taking the stairs instead of elevators and sitting out the next weigh-in later that week.

Read the piece I wrote on Marklives.com and find out how RocoMamas creates a street team of evangelists behind their burger shop and restaurant.

 

The 100 list of things worth doing

A while back I wrote about the 100 list and promised you another post about it. After spending sometime thinking of ways to present it in writing, I finally decided that this would be it.

One of the things I do a lot of is talk about interesting things to do and experience as much of them as possible. But my thinking here has been quite rigid and business – focused in a way that makes it difficult to write about anything else.

Getting out of the boxes

The 100 list is partly me getting out that box and partly challenging myself and you to do certain things over the next year. Call it ‘living the dream’.

We all thrive where there is a bit of variety and interesting things do. That variety, adventure and word of mouse is what the 100 list all about.

.  . . but what for?

There are entrepreneurial companies out there that provide phenomenally amazing service, which we never get to talk about. Instead the ones that give us crap get more mention. The 100 list is where I will talk about them.

There are quite a few things I want to do over time which seem to get put off and once after a while they get relegated far from memory. And we tell ourselves they weren’t worth doing anyway.

Ones that are worth doing

For the ones that are worth doing there’s the 100 list. To start off here are a few things I plan to over the next year:

This list will grow over time as more activities come to mind. Some I can only mention later on.

What things have you put off that are still worth doing? Tell us in the comments. And if you happen to be from Urban, feel free to email me.

Photo credit: Photo by Johannesen on Flickr

http://www.urbandegree.co.za/home.htm